Potentially preventable deaths from cancer, heart disease, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease and stroke were more common in rural than urban counties between 2010 and 2017, according to a study released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disparity between rural and urban counties increased over the period for cancer, heart disease and chronic lower respiratory diseases; decreased for unintentional injury due to a sharp rise in urban areas; and was relatively unchanged for stroke. “There are proven strategies for reducing health risks like cigarette smoking and obesity and we need to redouble our prevention efforts to reach those living in rural areas, where risks tend to be higher,” said CDC Director Robert Redfield, M.D. According to a report released last week by CDC, preventing a range of adverse childhood experiences from abuse to witnessing violence also could reduce U.S. deaths from heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, diabetes and suicide.

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